Answer: The speaker sees that lust has blinded his reasoning power. Sonnet 147 Summary The speaker begins by comparing his "love" to a "fever." An analysis of the most important parts of the poem Sonnet 147 by William Shakespeare, written in an easy-to-understand format. At the interpersonal level, he can be somewhat egotistical, prone to giving in to lust, and even at times lackadaisical in keeping his commitment to his chosen vocation of writing, but all in all, he is quite industrious, loves beauty, truth, and love, rendering him an amiable and trustworthy fellow. Copmaring Shakespeare's Sonnets 116 and 147 Light/Dark. Here's where you'll find analysis about the play as a whole. By:Alex & Ronak It is believed that Shakespeare was born April 23rd 1564 in Stratford-upon-Avon. Summary. Introduction and Text of Sonnet 147 At first, Sonnet 147 appears to be merely the speaker’s musing about his uncontrolled desires for the affection of the mistress, but it turns out that he is actually addressing her as he examines his situation. In Shakespeare’s Sonnet 147, for instance, the speaker’s love is compared to a disease. Submit your Email Now. However, he longs for the thing that keeps him ill, or in love. Sonnet 149. What is visual communication and why it matters Answer: The speaker examines and condemns his unhealthy attachment to the dark lady, bemoaning his loss of reason, the result of allowing his lower nature to rule his conscience. Shakespeare's surviving work includes 38 plays and 154 sonnets. A Brief History One of the Dark Lady sonnets – compared to earlier sonnets, these are more spiteful and darker in nature. My love is as a fever, longing still For that which longer nurseth the disease; Feeding on that which doth preserve the ill, The uncertain sickly appetite to please. Shakespeare was an English Playwright and poet. Only in the couplet does it become clear that the speaker has all along been addressing his ravings to his mistress. My love is as a fever longing still, For that which longer nurseth the disease; Feeding on that which doth preserve the ill, The uncertain sickly appetite to please. For school I need to analyze the sonnet, describe the theme, include literary elements, diction and the tone. Sonnet 147: Translation to modern English My love is like a fever, still constantly desiring the thing that caused the illness; feeding on the thing that prolongs it, to please the unhealthy appetite of my body. Sonnet 147 Lyrics. SONNET 12. But the Sonnets have been read, interpreted, reprinted and written about ever since their first idea. Line 1 Answer: The first line, "My love is as a fever, longing still," features a simile. Continue reading for complete analysis and meaning in the modern text. He can no long think rationally, because of his irrational craving for an unhealthy relationship with the slattern, to whom he has allowed himself the misfortune of becoming attached. This is a short summary of Shakespeare sonnet 147. Consequently, sonnet 144 is a high drama, high stakes poem where both characters battle it out for the heart and soul of the speaker. A jolted lover is describing their inability to stop loving their mistress, who has not seemed to remain faithful. The individual who allows sexual urgings to dominate his thoughts finds it virtually impossible to put that genie back in the bottle. Shakespeare’s Sonnets are some of the most interesting and famous poems written in English. That time of year thou mayst in me behold: That time of year when you see me: When yellow leaves, or none, or few, do hang: with few or no autumn leaves: Upon those boughs which shake against the cold, on branches shaking against the cold: Bare ruined choirs, where late the sweet birds sang. In the first quatrain, the speaker admits that he is still in the throes of sexual longing for the woman. The speaker understands that he has allowed himself to become driven by these perverse desires which cause "[his] thoughts" and his speech to become as frenzied as "madmen’s are." Summary The poet now somberly ponders why his soul, as "Lord" of his body, spends so much of its time seeking earthly desires when it should be most concerned a. Marcus Gheeraerts the Younger (c.1561–1636). Like many of the sonnets written by Shakespeare, sonnet 147 was written to or about the Dark Lady. The theme of evil is also present as relates to illness/love. ... Sonnet 147. The English sonnet has three quatrains, followed by a final rhyming couplet. The speaker then asserts that his "reason" or "physician," metaphorically his capability of thinking clearly, has abandoned him. My love is as a fever longing still, For that which longer nurseth the disease; Feeding on that which doth preserve the ill, The uncertain sickly appetite to please. The fact that he compares his love to an illness suggests that he knows his love is a bad idea, but he is defenseless against loving the subject. Summary. The image of feeding in Sonnet 146 continues in Sonnet 147, only now the feeding is not on death but on illness, and there is no possibility of immortality from lusting after the mistress: "My love is as a fever . However, instead of describing love in a starry-eyed fashion, Shakespeare discusses the punitive characteristics of love in Sonnet 147. Blog. The final sonnets concerning the mistress, beginning with this one, return the poet to the disturbed state of previous sonnets. However, he longs for the thing that keeps him ill, or in love. SONNET 147: PARAPHRASE: My love is as a fever, longing still : My love is like a fever, still longing: For that which longer nurseth the disease, For that which feeds the disease, Feeding on that which doth preserve the ill, Feeding on that which prolongs the illness, The uncertain sickly appetite to please. He knows that such longing is unhealthy and calls it a "sickly appetite." My reason, the physician to my love, Angry that his prescriptions are not kept, The speaker states that because of his lost ability to reason he now continues to confuse desire and death. Shakespeare Sonnets: Summary & Analysis 154 sonnets with translation, Shakespeare Sonnet 147 Analysis: My love is as a fever, longing still. Shakespeare’s Sonnet 147 Analysis. The individual who allows sexual urgings to dominate his thoughts finds it virtually impossible to put that genie back in the bottle. Any help would be greatly appreciated! The couplet not only hurls an accusation at the filthy woman, "Who [is] as black as hell," and "as dark as night," but it also reveals the exact spot on which the speaker’s mental health is shining its light: he made the mistake of believing that the woman was a loving as well as lovely creature, but her true personality and behavior have revealed to him a monstrous prevaricator, who is incapable of truth and fidelity. For I have sworn thee fair, and thought thee bright, Who art as black as hell, as dark as night. There’s an obvious sexual tone to the sonnet. Many believe Shakespeare’s sonnets are addressed to two different people he may have known. Possibly addresses Emilia Lanier – she was a patron of Shakespeare‟s theater company. Themes; Motifs; Symbols; Quotes. It follows the typical rhyme scheme of the form abab cdcd efef gg and is composed in iambic pentameter, a type of poetic metre based on five pairs of metrically weak/strong syllabic positions. Summary and Analysis; Sonnet 1; Sonnet 18; Sonnet 60; Sonnet 73; Sonnet 94; Sonnet 97; Sonnet 116; Sonnet 129; Sonnet 130; Sonnet 146; Main Ideas. The Shakespeare sonnets play an essential rôle in my poetry world. For the complete list of 154 sonnets, check the collection of Shakespeare Sonnets with analysis. For the complete list of 154 sonnets, check the collection of Shakespeare Sonnets with analysis. The Shakespearean sonnet is often used to develop a sequence of metaphors or ideas, one in each quatrain, while the couplet offers either a summary or a new take on the preceding images or ideas. He married a lady by Sonnet 147. John Hurt performs William Shakespeare's Sonnet 147 for the When Love Speaks album. Answer: Sonnet 147 is grouped with the "Dark Lady" sonnets 127-154
. He is now beyond cure and his reasoning does not even care “Past cure I am, now reason is past care,” and he is now in a frantic and restless condition “And frantic mad with evermore unrest,” His thoughts and words are now like a madman “My thoughts and my discourse as madmen’s are,” who just speaks random rubbish that does not express any truth “At random from the truth vainly expressed; Because he keeps swearing that his mistress is fair and beautiful “For I have sworn thee fair and thought thee bright,” even though she is a black as hell and as dark as the night “Who art as black as hell, as dark as night. Question: What kind of person is the speaker in Shakespeare's Sonnet 147? Don't use plagiarized sources. PARAPHRASE. In William Shakespeare’s Sonnet 147, the speaker addresses his beloved using a metaphor, stating that his love is like an illness. Get Your Custom Essay on Love is a Disease: An Explication of Sonnet 147 Just from $13,9/Page He remains aware that his reasonable physician, if he were still in touch with that entity, would continue to keep him cognizant of the desire to keep body and soul together. Comfort/Despair. The speaker then asserts that his "reason" or "physician," metaphorically his capability of thinking clearly, has abandoned him. Prezi Video + Unsplash: Access over two million images to tell your story through video; Nov. 21, 2020. We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. Love/Hate. The poet says his love is like a fever that still longs “My love is as a fever, longing still” for the very thing that prolongs his illness and woeful condition “For that which longer nurseth the disease,” It also thrives on the very reason for his illness “Feeding on that which doth preserve the ill,” just to satisfy his own sickly desire “Th’ uncertain sickly appetite to please.”, His own reasoning for this condition is like a physician for his love “My reason, the physician to my love, and like a doctor enraged when medicines aren’t taken, his reasoning has been angered “Angry that his prescriptions are not kept,” and has left him and now he is in a desperate condition “Hath left me, and I desp’rate now approve” and now realizes that desire is like death which is as the physician (his reasoning) expected and knew all along. Question: What is one literary device in the sonnet? Answer: The speaker examines and condemns his unhealthy attachment to the dark lady, bemoaning his loss of reason, the result of allowing his lower nature to rule his conscience. Dec. 1, 2020. The … Sonnet 147 turns the conventional idea of the lovesickness of the courtly lover on its head. . . He finds himself wavering in his ability to seek truth, which has always, heretofore, been his prerogative and preference. He considers himself, "frantic-mad with evermore unrest." For I have sworn thee fair and thought thee bright. My love is as a fever, longing still For that which longer nurseth the disease, Feeding on that which doth preserve the ill, The uncertain sickly appetite to please. My reason, the physician to my love, Angry that his prescriptions are not kept, Hath left me, and I desperate now approve Desire is death, which physic did except. First published in 1609, almost nothing is known about the poems’ style. My love is as a fever, longing still For that which longer nurseth the disease; Feeding on that which doth preserve the ill, The uncertain sickly appetite to please. Question: Can you give me a modern commentary of Sonnet 147? Those 154 classic sonnets skillfully dramatize truth, beauty, and love. William Shakespeare - Sonnet 147 (audio with text) - Duration: 1:17. He says the fever's not getting any better because it's "feeding" on the thing that makes it worse. If you continue to use this site we will assume that you are happy with it. Sonnet 150. PARAPHRASE. Sonnet 147 By William Shakespeare 2. Analysis of Shakespeare Sonnet 147? Sonnet CXLVII. My love is as a fever, longing still For that which longer nurseth the disease; Feeding on that which doth preserve the ill, The uncertain sickly appetite to please. Sonnet 147 My love is as a fever, longing still It is highly recommended to buy “The Monument” by Hank Whittemore, which is the best book on Shakespeare Sonnets. The speaker examines and condemns his unhealthy attachment to the dark lady, bemoaning his loss of reason, the result of allowing his lower nature to rule his conscience. The 8th line exemplifies a regular iambic pentameter: Sonnet 148. Sonnet 116: ‘Let me not to the marriage of true minds’, which is easily one of the most recognised of his poetry, particularly the first several lines.In total, it is believed that Shakespeare wrote 154 sonnets, in addition to the thirty-seven plays that are also attributed to him. The speaker then complains that he is "past cure," and he also lost his ability to even be concerned about his irrational state. My reason, the physician to my love, Angry that his prescriptions are not kept, Hath left me, and I desperate now approve Desire is death, which physic did except. Sonnet 130 satirizes the tradition – stemming from Greek and Roman literature – of praising the beauty of one’s affection by comparing it to beautiful things, typically in a hyperbolic manner. The fact that he compares his love to an illness suggests that he knows his love is a bad idea, but he is defenseless against loving the subject. Analysis of Sonnet 144 Line-By-Line. Sonnet 154. ... Shakespeare's Sonnet 130 (Analysis and Explanation) - Duration: 18:19. SONNET 73. The image of feeding in Sonnet 146 continues in Sonnet 147, only now the feeding is not on death but on illness, and there is no possibility of immortality from lusting after the mistress: “My love is as a fever . Sonnet 151. The final sonnets concerning the mistress, beginning with this one, return the poet to the disturbed state of previous sonnets. Sonnet 147 Analysis 1. 9/3/2014 0 Comments My love is as a fever, longing still For that which longer nurseth the disease, Feeding on that which doth preserve the ill, The uncertain sickly appetite to please. Answer: This speaker, as a representative of the poet Edward de Vere, aka "William Shakespeare," is a deep thinker, whose talent for creating poetry out of the raw material of thought and experience is unparalleled in the Western literary canon. Sonnet 144 is the only sonnet out of a total of 154 that involves both the fair youth and the dark lady, the two lead roles in Shakespeare's sonnet sequence. The speaker states that because of his lost ability to reason he now continues to confuse desire and death. Sonnet 153. Detailed explanations, analysis, and citation info for every important quote on LitCharts. Third Quatrain: Irrationality Has Stolen over Him. Sonnet 152. Question: Why does the speaker in Shakespeare's sonnet number 147 think his reason is messed up? (Translation: someone's got this dude all hot and bothered.) . The speaker of this sonnet is lovesick and in the poem reflects on how this love has affected him. Question: Who is the speaker in Shakespeare Sonnet 147? Download the entire Shakespeare's Sonnets translation as a printable PDF! It is highly recommended to buy “The Monument” by Hank Whittemore, which is the best book on Shakespeare Sonnets. Answer: The speaker of this sonnet and the other 153 in the sequence is a personal creation of the sonneteer, "William Shakespeare," whose real name is Edward de Vere, 17th Earl of Oxford. Shakespeare Sonnet 147 (Original Text) He knows that such longing is unhealthy and calls it a "sickly appetite." Question: What is the meaning behind the Shakespeare sonnet 147? Sonnet 147:My love is a fever, longing still By: William Shakespeare Interpretation and Analysis By: Alex Plavin 2. Question: What is the purpose of Shakespeare's Sonnet 147? Sonnet 147 is an English or Shakespearean sonnet. The original text plus a side-by-side modern translation of every Shakespeare play. The strong nature of such longings overcomes reason, and the aroused passion savagely seeks satisfaction. In the first quatrain, the speaker admits that he is still in the throes of sexual longing for the woman. My love is as a fever, longing stillFor that which longer nurseth the disease,Feeding on that which doth preserve the ill,Th’ uncertain sickly appetite to please.My reason, the physician to my love,Angry that his prescriptions are not kept,Hath left me, and I desp’rate now approveDesire is death, which physic did except.Past cure I am, now reason is past care,And frantic mad with evermore unrest,My thoughts and my discourse as madmen’s are,At random from the truth vainly expressed;For I have sworn thee fair and thought thee bright,Who art as black as hell, as dark as night. My reason, the physician to my love, Angry that his prescriptions are not kept, Hath left me, and I desperate now approve Desire is death, which physic did except. At first, Sonnet 147 appears to be merely the speaker’s musing about his uncontrolled desires for the affection of the mistress, but it turns out that he is actually addressing her as he examines his situation. He asserts that not only is his unhealthy longing a disease, but it also feeds upon itself, perpetuating and nursing itself and thus the horrific situation "doth preserve the ill.", Reckoning that his emotions elicit and perpetuate a degraded state, he chooses to reveal his hunger in medical terms, employing such words as "fever," "nurseth," "disease," and "ill." All these images result in leaving the patient with the "sickly appetite" which he feels he must somehow learn "to please.". This is a short summary of Shakespeare sonnet 147. In William Shakespeare’s Sonnet 147, the speaker addresses his beloved using a metaphor, stating that his love is like an illness. The De Vere Society is dedicated to the proposition that the works of Shakespeare were written by Edward de Vere, 17th Earl of Oxford. The final couplet gives the source of the "patient"'s sickness:. The speaker understands that he has allowed himself to become driven by these perverse desires which cause "[his] thoughts" and his speech to become as frenzied as "madmen’s are." He is the son of John Shakespeare and Mary Arden. Essential Tips to get success with English Literature. Question: What is the Sonnet 147's theme? He considers himself, "frantic-mad with evermore unrest." “Desire is death, which physic did except.”. Past cure I am, now Reason is past care, And frantic-mad with evermore unrest; My thoughts and my discourse as madmen’s are, At random from the truth vainly express’d; The speaker then complains that he is "past cure," and he also lost his ability to even be concerned about his irrational state. When I do count the clock that tells the time: When I count the ticking of the clock: And see the brave day sunk in hideous night, and watch the beautiful day sink into black night, When I behold the violet past prime: when I look at the faded violet: My reason, the physician to my love, Angry that his prescriptions are not kept, Hath left me, and I desperate now approve Desire is death, which physic did except. Past cure I am, now Reason is past care, And frantic-mad with evermore unrest; My thoughts and my discourse as madmen’s are, At random from the truth vainly express’d; For I have sworn thee fair, and thought thee bright, Who art as black as hell, as dark as night. The couplet not only hurls an accusation at the filthy woman, "Who [is] as black as hell," and "as dark as night," but it also reveals the exact spot on which the speaker’s mental health is shining its light: he made the mistake of believing that the woman was a loving as well as lovely creature, but her true personality and behavior have revealed to him a monstrous prevaricator, who is incapable of truth and fidelity. Only in the couplet does it become clear that the speaker has all along been addressing his ravings to his mistress. Sonnet 130: My mistress’ eyes are nothing like the sun Summary. In traditional poetry of courtly love, the male lover suffers from a "delightful disease" because he is so in love with his lady and cannot stand to be separated from her. . While the speaker of this sonnet sequence may be fairly accurately thought of as being the poet himself, it is still more convenient and ultimately more accurate to think of the speaker as a created character through which the poet speaks in his creations. Continue reading for complete analysis and meaning in the modern text. In this final sequence, the speaker targets an adulterous romance with a woman of questionable character; the term “dark” likely modifies the woman’s character flaws, not her skin tone. Answer: In Shakespeare sonnet 147, the speaker is examining and then condemning his unhealthy attachment to the dark lady, as he bemoans his loss of reason, the result of allowing his lower nature to rule his conscience. He asserts that not only is his unhealthy longing a disease, but it also feeds upon itself, perpetuating and nursing itself and thus the horrific situation "doth preserve the ill." Reckoning that his emotions elicit and perpetuate a degraded state, he chooses to reveal his hunger in medical terms, employing such words as "fever," "nurseth," "disease," and "ill." All these images result in leaving the patient with the "sickly appetite" which he feels he must somehow learn "to please." He can no long think rationally, because of his irrational craving for an unhealthy relationship with the slattern, to whom he has allowed himself the misfortune of becoming attached. He remains aware that his reasonable physician, if he were still in touch with that entity, would continue to keep him cognizant of the desire to keep body and soul together. The strong nature of such longings overcomes reason, and the aroused passion savagely seeks satisfaction. He finds himself wavering in his ability to seek truth, which has always, heretofore, been his prerogative and preference. These three pairs of words manage to sum up William Shakespeare's "Sonnet 116" and "Sonnet 147," while also demonstrating the duality of Shakespeare's heart.